Sep 4, 2012

Our Special Issue on Gender and Leadership

From the editor

By

Tim De Chant

Women have made great strides in the workplace in recent decades, especially when it comes to leadership positions.

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In this special issue on gender and leadership, we will explore some of the relevant research undertaken here at the Kellogg School. Paola Sapienza digs into the question of women and leadership, asking if men’s propensity to brag has any influence on their tendency to be elevated to higher positions. David Matsa approaches the female leadership question from another angle, discovering that when women reach the executive suite they lend other women a helping hand. And once women are in those positions of power, Matsa considers whether there is a female style of leadership.

Galen Bodenhausen approaches the issue of gender from a more cognitive perspective by investigating whether we assign gender to simple numbers. Alice Eagly sat down with us to round up some of the latest trends in gender research and to fill us in on what organizations and managers can do to treat their employees more equitably.

And lest we forget that opportunities for leadership often begin with a good education, Nicole Stephens tinkers with the college welcome letter to see if subtle changes can increase first-generation college students’ chances of success. It is a timely reminder that just getting into college is only half the battle.

We hope you enjoy our special issue!

(Our archive is full of relevant articles, too.)

About the Writer

Tim De Chant was science writer and editor of Kellogg Insight between 2009 and 2012.

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