Let Business Be Your Muse: Turn Your Workplace Wisdom into Haiku
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Strategy Feb 1, 2016

Let Business Be Your Muse: Turn Your Workplace Wisdom into Haiku

Join Kellogg’s strategy faculty in putting your favorite lessons into verse.

Yevgenia Nayberg

What would Wallace Stevens make of a PowerPoint presentation? How would Emily Dickinson handle an email chain?

If you have never daydreamed about how poets would spin the modern business world into verse, here is your chance.

You have a favorite business maxim, an adage, a dictum. A hard-won lesson that deserves to be commemorated for the ages. Can you transform it into a haiku?

Kellogg Insight wants you to write and share your business wisdom in haiku form. (You remember the haiku: a Japanese verse form with three unrhyming lines in five, seven, and five syllables. Don’t worry about taking a bit of poetic license with the form, though.)

Submit your haiku in the comments of this article or on Twitter (#bizhaiku) by March 1. We will post our favorites.

To get you started, we asked four members of the Kellogg School strategy department to put their favorite strategy lessons into haiku. And let’s just say: prepare to be inspired.

Editor’s note: Check out our favorite reader responses here.

Featured Faculty

Walter J. McNerney Professor of Health Industry Management; Faculty Director of PhD Program; Professor of Strategy

Associate Professor of Strategy

Elinor and H. Wendell Hobbs Professor of Management; Professor of Strategy; Faculty Director of Insight

Clinical Professor of Strategy

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