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Policy

How Well Does COVID Public Policy Align with Science?

In an era of misinformation, policy based on “dubious science” could mean a greater loss of life and economic hardship.

Angel investor flies in with funds for entrepreneur
Finance & Accounting

Should Local Governments Be Offering Tax Credits to Angel Investors?

New research casts doubt on whether these incentives actually spur innovation and economic growth.

Social Impact

How Racism Discouraged Volunteer Enlistment Immediately after Pearl Harbor

New research examines what happened when Black and Japanese men, who were battling discrimination at home, were asked to fight injustice abroad.

Policy

One Key Trait That Predicts How Much People Will Socially Distance

This new research could help policymakers deliver more effective COVID-safety messaging.

Policy

Unpacking the Federal Reserve’s Aggressive Response to COVID-19

A Kellogg professor spent the past year at the Fed. He explains the bank’s “guns-blazing” response—and the limits to these interventions.

Economics

Does Requiring Food-Stamp Recipients to Work Actually Increase Economic Self-Sufficiency?

The answer is increasingly urgent as politicians debate whether to reinstate the requirement, which was paused during the COVID-19 recession.

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Healthcare

Pharma Companies Argue That Lower Drug Prices Would Mean Fewer Breakthrough Drugs. Is That True?

Probably not, a new study suggests—as long as the price decreases are modest.

A group of nations' flags as credit cards
Finance & Accounting

How Credit Ratings Are Shaping Governments’ Responses to Covid-19

To fund pandemic-related spending, governments around the world will need to take on more debt. If they can.

New evidence examines how desegregation in Louisville shifted white voters' political views in the long term.
Policy

How Did School Desegregation Shape the Political Ideology of White Students Later in Life?

A new study suggests that, more than four decades later, the impact of these policies on political leanings is apparent.

Economics

Why the Next Round of COVID-19 Aid Should Target Industries That Can’t Work from Home

A new study pinpoints which sectors—and which workers in those sectors—suffered the most. Congress should take note.

Policy

How Is the Pandemic Affecting Antitrust Enforcement?

Deals will be ramping up again soon. Companies shouldn’t expect a free pass from regulators.

Policy

The Wrong Way to Ramp Up COVID-19 Testing

Robust testing is key to safely reopening the economy. But a new model shows that if testing is not paired with “smart containment,” it could backfire.

Innovation

The U.S. Is Full of Innovative Thinkers. The Government Needs to Marshal All of Them to Fight Covid-19.

Here’s how we can accelerate efforts to reduce the spread, develop treatments, and find a vaccine.

Policy

What Can the Federal Government Do to Get the Economy Back on Track?

A former White House economist weighs the pros and cons of job-retraining programs, aid for states, and universal basic income.

Economics

Here’s How Americans Are Spending Their Stimulus Checks

Real-time data pinpoints what we’re buying, and who’s spending the fastest.

Policy

Containing COVID-19 Will Devastate the Economy. Here’s the Economic Case for Why It’s Still Our Best Option.

The death toll from failing to contain the virus will be far more costly to society.

Policy

How to Shore Up State and Local Budgets during a Coronavirus Recession

State governments are responsible for implementing much of the social safety net. They’ll be looking to the federal government for extra help.

Policy

Containing COVID-19 Will Devastate the Economy. Here’s the Economic Case for Why It’s Still Our Best Option.

The death toll from failing to contain the virus will be far more costly to society.

Policy

How to Shore Up State and Local Budgets during a Coronavirus Recession

State governments are responsible for implementing much of the social safety net. They’ll be looking to the federal government for extra help.

Policy

When Do Open Borders Make Economic Sense?

A new study provides a window into the logic behind various immigration policies.

Policy

Dozens of New Terrorist Organizations Emerge Each Year. Which Ones Will Become Most Dangerous?

A new tool gets at the answer using the same techniques that investors use to evaluate startups.

Healthcare

Would “Medicare for All” Really Reduce Healthcare Costs in the U.S.?

Single payer drives significant savings in countries like Canada. But new research suggests it might play out differently in the U.S.

Finance & Accounting

Is Maximizing Shareholder Value a Thing of the Past?

Top CEOs recently “redefined” the purpose of a corporation. Kellogg faculty weigh in.

Federal interrogator grills smartphone.
Policy

Why Antitrust Regulators Don’t Scare Big Tech

A business law expert explains why the market is more likely than the government to rein in Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google.

Policy

The Business Case for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Two economists propose a bipartisan immigration overhaul, with an eye towards the future of the labor force.

Politics & Elections

When People Think Their Neighbors Support Trump, They’re More Likely to Express Anti-immigrant Views

Social norms are powerful—but fluid. A study of the 2016 election shows how they can change.

Policy

Do Soda Taxes Work? It’s Complicated.

A look at the Philadelphia soda tax shows that it had some benefits—but it didn’t stop people from buying sugary drinks.

Policy

We’re at a Data Privacy Crossroads. Where Do We Go From Here?

What individuals, regulators, and companies need to consider as we live more of our lives online.

A municipality grows within a piggy bank.
Policy

Do High Local Taxes Really Hurt Economic Growth?

Corporate incentives and low tax rates are supposed to make a city more business-friendly. An economist explains why that’s often not the case.

Economics

A Nation’s Wealth May Depend on How Much Its Workers Can Learn on the Job

New research suggests that formal schooling is not the panacea to global inequality that many have long believed it to be.

Finance & Accounting

What Causes Stock Market Swings?

Tariffs? Job reports? Oil prices? A new volatility index pinpoints which factors make investors feel uncertain.

Policy

How Big Is the Gender Gap in Science Research Funding?

Two new studies look at who wins the prestigious grants and prizes that can make or break a scientist’s career.

Man reading financial literacy book in living room.
Careers

Worried You’re Not Saving Enough for Retirement? Here’s What You Can Do.

An economist offers suggestions for individuals and policymakers to help make retirement more secure.

Policy

Do Police Body Cameras Provide an Impartial Version of Events?

New research reveals that people assign blame differently after viewing body cam versus dash cam footage.

Policy

Podcast: How the Boston Marathon Bombing Created a Rorschach Test for Perceptions of Race

And how a Kellogg professor found himself unexpectedly involved in the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Policy

Which Voters Want to Expand Medicaid? Maybe Not the Ones You Think

4-year degree-holders tend to be big supporters—even though they are personally unlikely to benefit.