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October 1, 2022

How We Justify Our Unpopular Opinions

The tactic makes controversial views more palatable to others—and has implications for the rampant spread of fake news.

group of people protest in shadow of a statue to earlier protestors.
October 1, 2022

When Do People Protest and When Do They Just Grumble? History Offers Clues.

A tradition of anti-government uprisings can impact communities centuries later.

a flag melding china and russia flags
September 28, 2022

China’s Future Will Reflect Russia’s

China learned from Russia’s post-1991 experience and pursued its economic liberalization with more care. But it ultimately could not avoid the political implications of pro-market policies and is now following Russia down the road to autocracy—continuing a century-long pattern of mirroring its neighbor’s historical trajectory.

two people cut a U.S. map with scissors
September 6, 2022

One Nation, Too Divided?

Political sectarianism is rampant in the U.S. Three experts discuss whether we can remain united.

Office with manager and well-appointed subordinate cubicle sharing political affiliation
September 1, 2022

Could Your Political Views Stymie Your Career?

From being hired to getting a promotion, new research shows you may be penalized for disagreeing politically with the boss.

group seated around thanksgiving table with one person hiding behind turkey drumstick
July 8, 2022

When Political Discussions Get Heated, Is It Best to Just Stay Out of It?

Keeping your head down when hot-button topics arise could come at a cost to your reputation.

illustration of two people putting ballots into ballot boxes
June 8, 2022

Take 5: Democracies and How They Thrive

A look at this form of government at a time when democracy is under stress around the world.

Political advertisements on television next to polling place
November 1, 2021

How Much Do Campaign Ads Matter?

Tone is key, according to new research, which found that a change in TV ad strategy could have altered the results of the 2000 presidential election.

Donkey and elephant write on computers
June 1, 2021

Civil Servants Often Work for Administrations They Disagree with Politically. How Does This Affect Their Job Performance?

While the benefits of insulating career bureaucrats are clear, new research explores whether there are downsides, too.

Politician and businessman congratulate each other at party.
February 1, 2021

Do Powerful Politicians Play Favorites with Their Corporate Friends?

A new study examines the power of public scrutiny to keep high-ranking officials in check.

people engage in conflict with swords
October 29, 2020

The Political Divide in America Goes Beyond Polarization and Tribalism

These days, political identity functions a lot like religious identity.

A man talks into another man's ear as money flies from his mouth
October 5, 2020

When Executives Donate to Politicians, How Much Are They Keeping Their Companies’ Interests in Mind?

A new study looks at the motivation behind these donations, which make up nearly a fifth of all political giving.

New evidence examines how desegregation in Louisville shifted white voters' political views in the long term.
September 1, 2020

How Did School Desegregation Shape the Political Ideology of White Students Later in Life?

A new study suggests that, more than four decades later, the impact of these policies on political leanings is apparent.

August 3, 2020

Why Are Social Media Platforms Still So Bad at Combating Misinformation?

Facebook, Twitter, and users themselves have few incentives to distinguish fact from fiction.

Public court records shed new light on judges' decision-making and the granting of petitions.
July 10, 2020

Why We Know So Little about Disparities within the Federal Court System—and How That’s Finally Changing

Millions of hard-to-obtain public court records shed new light on the fairness of the U.S. judiciary.

Donald Trump speaks to a crowd.
August 13, 2019

When People Think Their Neighbors Support Trump, They’re More Likely to Express Anti-immigrant Views

Social norms are powerful—but fluid. A study of the 2016 election shows how they can change.

Negative economic news can lead voters to perceive women as less capable candidates.
July 1, 2019

Are Voters Biased Against Female Politicians?

In many cases, no. But economic anxiety can ignite powerful gender stereotypes.

Toy soldiers and artillery prepare to charge forward on a strategy game board.
June 3, 2019

One Nation Invades Another. What Will Happen Next?

Game theory reveals why some conflicts escalate and others don’t.

a gymnast flips in a twitter bird spotlight
January 17, 2019

Which Gold Medalists Do We Tweet About? Liberals and Conservatives Differ

New research explores how political ideology can affect whose accomplishments we celebrate.

A person votes on Medicaid expansion.
January 7, 2019

Which Voters Want to Expand Medicaid? Maybe Not the Ones You Think

4-year degree-holders tend to be big supporters—even though they are personally unlikely to benefit.

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The Insightful Leader

September 12, 2022  ·  26:44 minutes
September 5, 2022  ·  24:00 minutes