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September 2022

Politics & Elections

China’s Future Will Reflect Russia’s

China learned from Russia’s post-1991 experience and pursued its economic liberalization with more care. But it ultimately could not avoid the political implications of pro-market policies and is now following Russia down the road to autocracy—continuing a century-long pattern of mirroring its neighbor’s historical trajectory.

Organizations

Gender-Balanced Teams Do Better Work

When it comes to teams of scientists, “men and women are both part of the recipe for success,” according to new research.

Marketing

Podcast: Is Your Brand Working?

In the fifth and final episode of our series, “Insight Unpacked: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them,” we look at how to measure your brand’s health–and what you should do if you don’t like what you learn.

Politics & Elections

One Nation, Too Divided?

Political sectarianism is rampant in the U.S. Three experts discuss whether we can remain united.

Policy

The Thorny Challenge of Measuring Success in “Systems-of-Care” Networks

These networks, which help direct people to the medical and social services they need, must tread carefully in choosing which metrics to use in decision-making.

inventors bring lightbulbs to a factory
Finance & Accounting

What Happens to Innovation During an Economic Crisis?

The Great Depression hastened the end of the independent inventor—but not all was lost.

Marketing

Podcast: How Will You Tell Your Brand’s Story?

In episode 4 of our 5-episode series, “Insight Unpacked: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them,” learn the importance of transmedia brand storytelling—and how to do it right.

Finance & Accounting

Unilever Should Divest Ben & Jerry’s

An economist offers his perspective on why the food giant has some big decisions to make in the wake of a court ruling against its ice cream subsidiary.

person in health clinic looking at poster of anthropomorphic virus
Healthcare

How Humanizing Disease Could Be a New Public Health Tool

Anthropomorphizing a disease changes how we feel about it—and the steps we take to avoid it.

Office with manager and well-appointed subordinate cubicle sharing political affiliation
Politics & Elections

Could Your Political Views Stymie Your Career?

From being hired to getting a promotion, new research shows you may be penalized for disagreeing politically with the boss.

August 2022

Marketing

Podcast: What Should Your Brand Look (and Sound and Smell) Like?

In episode 3 of our 5-episode series, “Insight Unpacked: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them,” we discuss the associations you want customers to make with your brand, and how to use design to make it happen.

Economics

The Food Crisis Is Bigger Than Ukraine

While Russia’s war has undoubtedly caused real problems in global food markets, they are different and more complex than what most news coverage suggests.

Innovation

Take 5: How to Improve the Odds of Breakthrough Innovation

Thorny problems demand novel solutions. Here’s what it takes to move beyond incremental tweaks.

Marketing

Podcast: What Should You Name Your Brand?

In episode 2 of our 5-episode series, “Insight Unpacked: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them,” we dig into the importance of finding the right name for your brand. With apologies to Shakespeare, a rose by any other name wouldn’t smell as sweet.

Finance & Accounting

5 Trends to Watch as the Economy Emerges from the Pandemic

From inflation and remote work to climate change, here’s where the global economy appears to be headed.

Marketing

Podcast: Why Does Your Brand Need to Exist?

In episode 1 of our 5-episode series, “Insight Unpacked: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them,” we reveal the key questions you should answer before you start to craft your brand.

Marketing

Podcast: Introducing Insight Unpacked, Season 1

Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them

Marketing

Whiz! Bang! Boom! Energetic Ads Hold Viewers’ Attention

Louder, busier commercials are the new norm. And they seem to be working.

Organizations

The Surprising Way Crowd Size Affects Our Tendency to Cheat

Organizations would be wise to understand the psychology behind this phenomenon.

Social Impact

For Those Living in Poverty, Therapy Can Have Benefits Beyond Mental Health

A large study suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy can also improve physical health and economic outcomes.

Policy

How Former Enemies Can Develop Trust

A simple intervention can help diffuse animosity toward onetime armed foes, a study shows.

July 2022

Careers

Take 5: Learn to Love Networking (or at Least Tolerate It)

A look at the social and psychological factors that can make networking uncomfortable and how to overcome them.

Finance & Accounting

Jeff Ubben Explains His “Anti-ESG ESG” Investment Strategy

In a recent conversation with Kellogg’s Robert Korajczyk, the hedge-fund leader breaks down his unique approach to mission-driven investing.

Politics & Elections

When Political Discussions Get Heated, Is It Best to Just Stay Out of It?

Keeping your head down when hot-button topics arise could come at a cost to your reputation.

Innovation

Does the Public Benefit from the Scientific Research It Funds?

A new study quantifies how U.S. taxpayer-funded research is used in patents, media, and policy decisions.

Entrepreneurship

Podcast: How Can Entrepreneurs Develop a Stellar Sales Pitch?

On this episode of The Insightful Leader’s “Ask Insight,” two seasoned entrepreneurs share wisdom from the trenches.

two people look out over a city
Strategy

Where Does Capitalism Go Next?

A conversation on “creative destruction,” growth, and designing a more equitable capitalist future.

Social Impact

How to Build a More Diverse Environmental Movement

People of color will disproportionately suffer from climate change, yet there is a striking lack of diversity in mainstream environmental organizations. Broadening what counts as an environmental issue could build a larger, more inclusive coalition.

Innovation

The Desire to Be Acquired Is Stifling Innovation at Startups

The result is “more-conventional, less-radical, less-novel innovation,” adding a new wrinkle to antitrust debates.

Careers

What to Consider Before Taking a Job at a Family-Owned Business

Working for a family firm can be rewarding, but you should do your homework first to make sure it’s the right place for you.

June 2022

Leadership

Podcast: Managing Up, Managing Across, and Retaining Your Best Employees

On this episode of The Insightful Leader’s “Ask Insight”: you asked and our faculty answered. We dig into a mailbox of listener questions on leadership and management.

lobby of a healthcare facility
Healthcare

Where Is the U.S. Healthcare Industry Headed?

New business models abound, private equity is expanding, and healthcare workers are hard to find.

cityscape with pricetags
Finance & Accounting

Real Estate Investors See Opportunity, Despite Inflation and Uncertainty

“The pace at which the world is changing in terms of how people use space is extremely exciting.”

Leadership

Podcast: What One School District’s Fiasco Says About the Strengths and Limits of AI

On this episode of The Insightful Leader: When Boston Public Schools looked to algorithms to solve equity issues and save money, it ran into a roadblock—the complicated lives of parents and students.

Social Impact

How to Measure Your Organization’s Social Impact

Smart people and good intentions don’t guarantee success. You need a thoughtful plan to measure what you are actually accomplishing.

Careers

How to Craft a Fulfilling Career

Practical tips for aligning your values with your work.

Politics & Elections

Take 5: Democracies and How They Thrive

A look at this form of government at a time when democracy is under stress around the world.

Economics

Did China’s One-Child Policy Prompt Households to Save More?

Researchers investigate whether the lack of a “family safety net” is responsible for China’s singularly high household savings rate.

Economics

How Local Disruptions Can Affect the Global Supply Chain

A new study of the Kenyan flower industry can help buyers and suppliers prepare for uncertainty.

Economics

How One Tax Reform Led to More Women in the Workforce Decades Later

A study of a major fiscal change in Italy shows how much individual lives are affected when governments get more efficient.

Healthcare

Consumers Pay When Generic Drug Companies Collude. Here’s a Way to Stop Them.

Price-fixing by pharmaceutical cartels can cost billions, and the threat of lawsuits isn’t enough to deter it.

May 2022

Leadership

Podcast: Executive Presence—Do You Have It?

This week, an episode from the archives: It’s not enough to be good at your job. On this episode of The Insightful Leader, learn how to develop the gravitas that commands attention and respect.

Finance & Accounting

Can Investors Create Profitable Trading Strategies Based on Academic Findings?

It hasn’t been clear if information from the ivory tower translates to the trading-room floor. A new study tackles the question by looking at research on earnings announcements.

Finance & Accounting

Apple’s Inflation Problem

The company faces a “double whammy” due to its cash hoarding.

person skateboarding while shopping on smartphone
Marketing

For Brands, Perfection Is Out and Authenticity Is In

“It helps you seem more trustworthy and enjoyable, like a friend who is going to give you advice on what to buy.”

Marketing

The Psychological Factor That Helps Shape Our Moral Decision-Making

We all have a preferred motivation style. When that aligns with how we’re approaching a specific goal, it can impact how ethical we are in sticky situations.

Policy

Larry Summers on Inflation and the Fed’s Attempts to Cool the Economy

In a recent Q&A with Kellogg’s Jan Eberly, Summers is skeptical that the economy can achieve a “soft landing.”

Leadership

Podcast: What People Get Wrong about Setting Goals

On this episode of The Insightful Leader, we hear how leaders can help their teams—and themselves—turn ambitious goals into reality.

group of people engaged in a problem-solving exercise
Policy

Tackling Global Poverty Takes More Than Cash

New research points to the power of including psychosocial interventions—such as group problem-solving—alongside economic ones.

April 2022

Economics

Why Are U.S. Companies Hoarding So Much Cash?

More than anything else, it comes down to taxes.

Policy

China Is Caught in a COVID-19 Trap of Its Own Making

Why moderating its “zero-COVID” strategy is proving difficult.

Strategy

Be a Better Negotiator by Having a “BATNA”

Understand where you’re going when you can’t get to yes.

Leadership

Take 5: How to Be a Better Mentor

Be sure your mentee “owns” the relationship—and don’t shy away from tough conversations.

Social Impact

Podcast: What Should DEI Work Actually Look Like?

On this episode of The Insightful Leader’s “Ask Insight”—where our listeners ask questions of our faculty experts respond—we learn that changing the status quo will take self-reflection and time.

people in various states on a U.S. map look at a graph measuring policy uncertainty.
Economics

How Does Economic Uncertainty Play Out at the Local Level?

Indexing policy uncertainty by state provides new insights—and offers local governments a cautionary tale.

Economics

3 Economic Implications of Russia’s War on Ukraine

“We are seeing a world that’s going to be less than the sum of its parts.”

Healthcare

We Hear a Lot about New Drugs. But What Spurs Innovation in Medical Procedures?

There’s been little research on what brings about new procedures, despite how life-changing they can be.

group of working class people at bar watch TV of fed interest rate hike
Economics

When Interest Rates Climb, Some Workers Are Left Behind

When the Fed moves to cool the economy, it can disproportionately hurt female, Black, and less-educated workers in slack labor markets.

Marketing

To Boost Engagement, News Orgs Need to Reconsider the Click

Not all pageviews are equal. Indeed, some clicks actually spur people to unsubscribe from a site.

Healthcare

How Social Stigma Can Dissuade Us from Taking Care of Our Health

A new study explores the decisions that go into seeking preventative care.

March 2022

Organizations

Is a Four-Day Workweek Right for Your Company?

There’s a reason more and more organizations are considering this option.

Strategy

Podcast: How to Design Incentives That Motivate Employees

On this episode of The Insightful Leader, we learn why it’s not always as simple as handing out a performance bonus.

Finance & Accounting

What Can We Learn from Amazon’s Stock Split?

We may have to wait and see what this move signals for the tech sector.

Economics

Will Putin's War Slow China's Growth?

The additional spike in food and energy prices caused by the Russia–Ukraine conflict could be devastating for China. But the country’s neutral political stance toward the war may also yield economic gains.

Policy

5 Things You May Not Know about Tax Policy

How do income taxes impact people’s career choices? And do soda taxes actually work?

Policy

How Climate Disasters Ripple Through the Labor Market

Environmental crises are increasingly leading workers to migrate. What happens next?

Marketing

We React Differently to Paper vs. Digital Requests

Our willingness to act virtuously changes depending on how we’re asked.

Leadership

Podcast: Cybersecurity, Part 2 | How to Respond to a Breach

In the second episode of our two-part series, former NSA director Mike Rogers discusses what to do if your defensive tactics have failed and your network is exposed.

Leadership

3 DEI Leadership Lessons from Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Supreme Court Nomination

Studying Biden’s nomination process can help leaders “better connect their creeds and their deeds.”

Social Impact

Why Accusations of Discrimination Often Morph into Debates about Free Speech

A study of the psychology behind this common rhetorical tactic.

Data Analytics

How Gig Workers Push Back Against Their “Digital Boss”

Instead of having managers, these workers are beholden to customer reviews. The relationship is rocky.

February 2022

Leadership

Podcast: Cybersecurity, Part 1 | How to Avoid Becoming a Target

In the first episode of our two-part series, former NSA director Michael Rogers shares strategies for protecting your organization from a cyberattack.

Strategy

What Does the Invasion of Ukraine Mean for Cybersecurity?

Former NSA director Michael Rogers discusses the implications for companies.

Finance & Accounting

Meme Trading Is Not Dead—It Will Continue to Rile Markets

Investors are going to continue using social media to gain a trading edge.

three windowed offices with people meeting in each
Organizations

A DEI Reading List

Many organizations want to build a workplace that works for everyone. But simply wanting DEI efforts to succeed isn't enough; companies must take a systematic approach to ensuring that they succeed. Read on for some of our favorite advice from Kellogg faculty about the biases that hold diversity efforts back, and how organizations can combat them.

Economics

6 Takeaways on Today’s Economy

A finance professor breaks down the data on inflation, the labor market, and the future of cities.

Leadership

Podcast: How to Lead a Great Virtual Meeting

Zoom doesn’t have to be a drag. On this episode of The Insightful Leader, we discuss some rules of the road.

Marketing

Why Are Super Bowl Ads a Spectator Sport?

With the big game coming up, many fans are gearing up... to watch brands go toe-to-toe

Entrepreneurship

How to Talk About Selling Your Startup without Causing Everyone to Panic

An excerpt from the new book Exit Right explains why you should have the “exit talk” early and often.

Finance & Accounting

Would Housing Cost Less If It Were Easier to Build New Homes? Surprisingly, Not Much.

A new study suggests that supply and demand are only part of a complex problem.

Policy

Psychological Factors—More Than Demographics—Drive Vaccine Behavior

The finding gives policymakers and medical professionals an important tool.

Policy

Is an Efficient Government Always a Good Thing?

History sheds light on how processes designed to serve citizens can also be put to nefarious ends.

Economics

Covid Hit in an Era of Broadband and Zoom. How Much Did That Help the Economy?

A new study sheds light on the impact of remote work on GDP in 2020.

Organizations

Hoping to Drive Social Change at Work? Here’s a Tip.

Certain social movement hashtags and labels could turn off the allies you want to recruit.

Organizations

What the Psychology of Resilience Can Tell Us About Enduring the Pandemic

Plus, what organizations can do to help their employees cope.

January 2022

Organizations

The Robots Are Not Coming

Those predictions of a robot takeover may not come to fruition.

a group of coworkers play frisbee on a zoom call
Organizations

3 Best Practices for Virtual Meetings

Make your next Zoom session less exhausting and more inspiring.

people in 1967 and 2022 react to advertising
Marketing

How Has Marketing Changed over the Past Half-Century?

Phil Kotler’s groundbreaking textbook came out 55 years ago. Sixteen editions later, he and coauthor Alexander Chernev discuss how big data, social media, and purpose-driven branding are moving the field forward.

Organizations

It May Be Time to Reconsider That Noncompete Agreement

Federal regulators are cracking down on hiring practices that restrict employees’ wages and ability to work for competitors. Here’s what companies should know.

Leadership

Podcast: Are You Promoting the Right People to Management?

On this episode of The Insightful Leader: How to identify leadership talent—and how to advance the careers of employees who aren’t looking to manage others.

Finance & Accounting

SPACs: What You Don’t Understand Can Cost You Money

A Kellogg professor offers his perspective on why these investment vehicles can be losing propositions for many casual investors.

Economics

When a Bunch of Economists Look at the Same Data, Do They All See It the Same Way?

Not at all, according to a recent study, which showed just how much noise can be introduced by researchers’ unique analytical approaches.

Marketing

Does Distance Make the Consumer’s Heart Grow Fonder?

New research finds that how far we’re standing from a product changes what we think of it.

Finance & Accounting

Take 5: What Good Does It Do a Company to Do Good?

Kellogg faculty look at how ESG initiatives are received by investors, customers, and employees.

December 2021

Leadership

Podcast: How to Lead During Difficult Times

The good news is you may already have the skills you need. On this episode of The Insightful Leader, we’ll learn about doubling down on that expertise to help your team through a crisis.

Data Analytics

Podcast: Why You Need a Working Knowledge of AI

Business leaders can’t rely solely on data scientists to get the job done. Learn more on this episode of The Insightful Leader.