Podcast: The (Surprisingly Muddy) Case for Transparency
Skip to content
Explore Our Coronavirus Coverage
Operations Leadership Feb 20, 2020

Podcast: The (Surprisingly Muddy) Case for Transparency

Economists prize sharing information. On this episode of The Insightful Leader, we ask if that’s always the right move.

A transparent supply chain is generally a good thing. But there are drawbacks to keep in mind.

Based on the research and insights of

Robert L. Bray

Listening: The (Surprisingly Muddy) Case for Transparency
download
0:00 Skip back button Play Skip forward button 13:35

Businesses have to make all kinds of decisions about if and when to share information. Should you notify customers the instant that their package has shipped? If your warehouse is running low on inventory, do your retailers need to know?

Add Insight
to your inbox.

We’ll send you one email a week with content you actually want to read, curated by the Insight team.

There’s a classic rule in economics that could help answer these questions. This rule says that more transparency and better communication should always lead to better outcomes.

But research from Robert Bray, an associate professor of operations at Kellogg, suggests that this rule doesn’t always hold up. Hear when it might make more sense to keep your cards close to the vest.

Note: The Insightful Leader is produced for the ear, and not meant to be read as a transcript. We encourage you to listen to the audio version above. However, a transcript of this episode is available here.

About the Writer

Morgan Levey is an audio producer in Missoula, Montana.

Suggested For You
Most Popular

High achievers often worry they aren’t qualified to weigh in. Here’s how to get past those self-sabotaging thoughts.

Democracies may not outlast dictatorships, but they adapt better.

Most Popular Podcasts

Coworkers can make us crazy. Here’s how to handle tough situations.

Plus: Four questions to consider before becoming a social-impact entrepreneur.

Finding and nurturing high performers isn’t easy, but it pays off.

A Broadway songwriter and a marketing professor discuss the connection between our favorite tunes and how they make us feel.

More in Operations