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Podcast | Insight Unpacked Season 1: Extraordinary Brands and How to Build Them
an accountant and a robot accountant wearing green visors work back-to-back at desks.
December 6, 2022

Which Workers Suffer Most When New Technology Arrives?

It’s not necessarily who you think.

employees unload pallets from a truck using hand carts
December 1, 2022

What Happens to Worker Productivity after a Minimum Wage Increase?

A pay raise boosts productivity for some—but the impact on the bottom line is more complicated.

people building a bridge, with blue bricks from the left side and red bricks from the right side
December 1, 2022

4 Science-Backed Strategies to Curb Partisan Animosity

Vilification of the other side is at a fever pitch. But research suggests ways to bridge the gap.

person climbing a small ladder against a wall with longer ladders
December 1, 2022

How COVID Changed the Way Americans Think about Economic Inequality

For some, the pandemic laid bare the social factors that can keep people down. But not everyone adopted a new perspective.

two people look out over a city
November 28, 2022

Post-War Reconstruction Is a Good Investment

Ukraine’s European neighbors will need to make a major financial commitment to help rebuild its economy after the war. Fortunately, as the legacy of the post–World War II Marshall Plan shows, investing in Ukraine’s future will also serve Europe’s own long-term interests.

two people playing chess
November 1, 2022

How Experts Make Complex Decisions

By studying 200 million chess moves, researchers shed light on what gives players an advantage—and what trips them up.

Voting machine in a spider web
October 28, 2022

Why Are So Many Politicians Embracing Conspiracy Theories?

Conspiratorial thinking has always been attractive in times of uncertainty—but it’s become more mainstream. An expert explains why, and whether anything can be done.

energy bill with solar panels wind turbines and pipelines
October 13, 2022

What the New Climate Bill Means for the U.S.—and the World

The Inflation Reduction Act won’t reverse inflation or halt climate change, but it’s still a big deal.

four people stand in a circle, with one speaking and the others reflecting on their statement.
October 1, 2022

How We Justify Our Unpopular Opinions

The tactic makes controversial views more palatable to others—and has implications for the rampant spread of fake news.

group of people protest in shadow of a statue to earlier protestors.
October 1, 2022

When Do People Protest and When Do They Just Grumble? History Offers Clues.

A tradition of anti-government uprisings can impact communities centuries later.

A horse-drawn wagon pulls wheat through an autumnal wheatfield
October 1, 2022

Why Did So Many Ukrainians Die in the Soviet Great Famine?

They perished at a much higher rate than ethnic Russians during what’s known as Holodomor. A new study suggests this was a deliberate policy decision.

person with butterfly net attempting to capture data
October 1, 2022

Who Should Win the Tug-of-War over User Data?

It’s not always clear whether businesses or consumers should have more control. Research offers a new way of thinking through the problem.

a flag melding china and russia flags
September 28, 2022

China’s Future Will Reflect Russia’s

China learned from Russia’s post-1991 experience and pursued its economic liberalization with more care. But it ultimately could not avoid the political implications of pro-market policies and is now following Russia down the road to autocracy—continuing a century-long pattern of mirroring its neighbor’s historical trajectory.

two people cut a U.S. map with scissors
September 6, 2022

One Nation, Too Divided?

Political sectarianism is rampant in the U.S. Three experts discuss whether we can remain united.

person being raised up by large hands
September 6, 2022

The Thorny Challenge of Measuring Success in “Systems-of-Care” Networks

These networks, which help direct people to the medical and social services they need, must tread carefully in choosing which metrics to use in decision-making.

person in health clinic looking at poster of anthropomorphic virus
September 1, 2022

How Humanizing Disease Could Be a New Public Health Tool

Anthropomorphizing a disease changes how we feel about it—and the steps we take to avoid it.

Office with manager and well-appointed subordinate cubicle sharing political affiliation
September 1, 2022

Could Your Political Views Stymie Your Career?

From being hired to getting a promotion, new research shows you may be penalized for disagreeing politically with the boss.

coffee farms and mills in rural Kenya
August 26, 2022

The Food Crisis Is Bigger Than Ukraine

While Russia’s war has undoubtedly caused real problems in global food markets, they are different and more complex than what most news coverage suggests.

A man walks into a therapy room.
August 1, 2022

For Those Living in Poverty, Therapy Can Have Benefits Beyond Mental Health

A large study suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy can also improve physical health and economic outcomes.

August 1, 2022

How Former Enemies Can Develop Trust

A simple intervention can help diffuse animosity toward onetime armed foes, a study shows.

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The Insightful Leader

December 5, 2022  ·  12:16 minutes
November 18, 2022  ·  19:39 minutes
September 12, 2022  ·  26:44 minutes